Baby Boy Cambridge is Here! [UPDATE-3]

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Update 3: William and Kate have emerged from the Lindo Wing with the new prince. The couple are returning home to Kensington Palace, forgoing an overnight stay in the hospital as they did for Charlotte’s birth in 2015.

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Royal Roundup: Baby Watch Begins, Wedding Gift Details Revealed & an Update on Spain

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Restricted parking is officially up in front of the Lindo Wing at St Mary’s Hospital in London. This will be where the Duchess of Cambridge gives birth later this month, and though we don’t know the due date, we do know courtesy of signage that the space has been blocked off between April 9 and April 30. Because Kate’s children are usually late, my guess is the due date itself is on the earlier side.

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Margaret Beaufort & the Birth of Henry Tudor

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Margaret Beaufort later in life

On January 28, 1457 the future King Henry VII was born at Pembroke Castle in Wales, but the real star of the show was his mother, the Countess of Richmond. In fact, at the time of his birth it couldn’t have seemed less likely that the infant would one day ascend the English throne and it certainly wasn’t seen as an event of national importance. His father was Edmund Tudor, Earl of Richmond, the younger half-brother of King Henry VI, through the second marriage of their mother, Katherine of Valois.

But unlike Henry VI, who was fathered by the celebrated Henry V, Edmund and his siblings were fathered by a Welshman attached to Queen Katherine’s household, Owen Tudor. For political reasons, the relationship was conducted under the radar and it wouldn’t be until the early 1450s that Edmund and his younger brother, Jasper, were transitioned from a legally grey area to members of the peerage as the Earls of Richmond and Pembroke, respectively.

Because of these circumstances, the infant Henry Tudor born in 1457 had a better claim to the French crown than the English, if you disregard the Salic Law, barring inheritance of the throne through a woman (a pesky byproduct of the Hundred Years’ War).

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Kaiser Wilhelm II’s Britishness (And Left Arm)

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On January 27, 1859 Queen’s Victoria’s eldest daughter, Victoria, gave birth to her first child at the Crown Prince’s Palace in Berlin. The birth was difficult: There was a delay in alerting doctors that the princess was in labor, doctors were hesitant to physically examine her and the baby was in breach. After a long and complicated labor, during which the lives of both mother and child were in danger, a son was delivered.

Unfortunately, it soon became clear that the baby’s left arm had been badly injured at birth due to Erb’s palsy, a condition that causes paralysis from nerve  damage. Victoria, known as “Vicky” to her family, and her husband, Prince Frederick of Prussia, “Fritz,” were horrified – delivering a less than physically perfect heir to the Prussian throne was viewed as a personal failure by Vicky and raised concerns about the ability of their son to thrive in a masculine, militant court atmosphere.

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