Margaret Plantagenet, Queen of Scotland

Margaret_Plantagenet,_Queen_of_Scotland.JPG

Before Margaret Tudor married James IV of Scotland in 1503, there was another English Margaret who married a king of Scotland. And while this marriage didn’t bring about Great Britain, it did put the wheels in motion that would lead to the wars between England and Scotland during the reign of Margaret’s brother, Edward I, solidifying tension between the two countries that would last for centuries.

Continue reading “Margaret Plantagenet, Queen of Scotland”

Edward VII, Nellie Clifden & a Huge Overreaction

1024px-Prince_of_Wales,_later_King_Edward_VII_-_NARA_-_527805.jpg

If there was one element that impacted the psychological makeup of Edward VII more than any other it was the fact that he was a disappointment to his parents, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. That’s not conjecture – it was something they took pains to verbalize to him, write to him and discuss about him to others. His complete and total failure to meet their exacting and lofty standards for a perfect prince and heir was so plainly understood by the entire Royal Family and the Queen’s government that it practically howls off the historical record.

Continue reading “Edward VII, Nellie Clifden & a Huge Overreaction”

Royal Roundup: Kate to Appear on Oct. 10, the Invictus Games & Meghan Moving to London

Prince-William-Kate-Middleton-845385.jpg

Kensington Palace announced today that the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry will host a reception at Buckingham Palace in honor of World Mental Health Day (Oct. 10). Recognizing the work of mental health advocates and organizations across the UK, the event is very much in line with the trio’s work on behalf of Heads Together. It will also mark Kate’s first public appearance since the announcement that she is pregnant with her and William’s third child and is suffering from HG.

Continue reading “Royal Roundup: Kate to Appear on Oct. 10, the Invictus Games & Meghan Moving to London”

The Birth of Elizabeth I & Anne Boleyn’s Pregnancies

AnneBoleynSaysaFinalFarewelltoherDaughterPrincessElizabethGustafWappers1838auroravongtumbler.jpg

On April 12, 1533, Anne Boleyn appeared before Henry VIII’s court for the first time as queen. She was four months pregnant after a calculated gamble she and Henry took the previous autumn to secretly marry and consummate their relationship. For Henry this meant a frantic winter and early spring finalizing his divorce from Katherine of Aragon and solidifying the legality of his second marriage. For Anne, the quick conception was nothing short of a complete victory. Henry moved heaven and earth to make Anne his wife – her half of the deal was to deliver the son and heir he so desperately wanted.

Continue reading “The Birth of Elizabeth I & Anne Boleyn’s Pregnancies”

Whatever Will Happen to Buckingham Place?

buckingham-palace.jpg

I was going to tack on this weekend’s news about the Prince of Wales and Buckingham Palace to yesterday’s royal roundup, but as I dug into it I decided it deserved a post of its own. Long story short, there’s a rumor circulating that Charles is considering opening up BP for a longer portion of each year to increase the palace’s commercial viability and allow him to spend more time living elsewhere. BP would still be used for state occasions and serve as office space, as well as remain the monarch’s official residence.

Continue reading “Whatever Will Happen to Buckingham Place?”

Royal Roundup: The Preschool Break-In, Meghan & the Queen

Things may have quieted down this past week in comparison with last which saw the Cambridges’ baby announcement, Meghan Markle’s Vanity Fair cover and Prince George’s first day of school, but that didn’t mean the Duke of Cambridge wasn’t out and about, delivering on the promise that he would be doubling down on his public duties. Even so, the biggest news from this week was undoubtedly the fact that there was a break-in at George’s preschool, Thomas’s Battersea.

Continue reading “Royal Roundup: The Preschool Break-In, Meghan & the Queen”

The First Princess of Wales

Edward_of_Angouleme

If there ever was a case study for a Medieval woman’s life taking the shape of a romance novel plot, it would be Joan of Kent, England’s first Princess of Wales. Born “royal adjacent,” she grew up close to the throne, married three times (though not all of them were legal), delivered seven children and constantly found herself going up against the power brokers of court and the Vatican.

Continue reading “The First Princess of Wales”

Prince William & the Walpole Bastard

Maria_Walpole_Reynolds.jpg

In the middle of all the conversation about what an unlikely choice Meghan Markle is for the British Royal Family let’s take a moment to remember the time George III’s younger brother married the illegitimate daughter of a shop girl. Notably, the marriage was one of the liaisons that prompted the Royal Marriages Act of 1772, a fairly useless piece of legislation that didn’t do anyone much good.

Continue reading “Prince William & the Walpole Bastard”